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Fuller Up, The Dead Musician Directory
 
 
Tragic Accident (Misc.)
 
 
Click on name for biography on this page
Wong Ka Kui   Sonny Bono Savannah Churchill Ray Coniff
Lord Ulli      
 
 
 

 

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Filming TV Show

Wong Ka Kui
Age 31

Beyond

(b. 10 June 1962,
d. 30 June 1993)
 
Ka Kui went into a coma as a result of falling off a stage set while filming a Japanese comedy tv program.  He hit his head on the ground and was rushed to the hospital.  He died a week later.  

On the evening, Mr. Murakami Koichi of Fuji TV, held a press conference. Following is the extracts from it:  

"Mr. Wong Ka Kui, the member of Hong Kong's rock band 'BEYOND', who fell down unfortunally from a set during the filmming of 'Ucchan-nanchan no yarunara yaraneba' and has gone into the Tokyo joshi idai Hospital, died from several injury of the brain at 16:45 today 30th of June.  

     "We do pray for the repose of Ka Kui's soul. Also, we would like to offer our heartfelt condolences to Mr. Wong Ka Kui's family. This bad news is very regrettable for families and all his fans who have supported him from all over the world and we do express our regret for the news. In the future we promise never to cause such accidents and to do our best for it.   

 "His family and BEYOND were there when he was about to die.   
 

 Skiing accident

Sonny Bono
Age 62

Sonny and Cher
 
(b. Salvatore Bono, 12 Feb 1935, Detroit; d. 5 January 1998, Lake Tahoe, CA)  
   
  Rep. Sonny Bono, half of the singing team Sonny and  Cher before entering politics and being elected to Congress, was killed in a skiing accident near  Lake Tahoe, television networks reported Tuesday. The Douglas County, Nev., sheriff's department said Bono was reported missing about 7 p.m. Monday night and his body was found about 2 hours later. He was 62.  The accident occurred at the Heavenly Ski Resort in the popular skiing area around Lake Tahoe on the border of California and Nevada. Bono, a Republican, has represented California in the House of Representatives since 1994. Previously, he had served as the mayor of Palm Springs, Calif. But Bono's greatest fame was as a singer with his wife Cher in the 1960s and 1970s with such songs as "I Got You Babe." The two later split with Cher going on to her own entertainment career and Bono heading into politics.  
   
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Drunkard Crashed down from balcony

Savannah Churchill
Age 53
 
(b. Savannah Valentine, 21 August 1920, Colfax, Louisiana, and raised in Brooklyn, N Y C,
d. 20 April 1974)
 

Churchill typified the urbane R&B style of the '40s that could be characterized as jazz, blues, or pop depending on the song and the arrangement. In 1956 her career was virtually ended when she suffered long-term debilitating injuries after a drunk fell on top of her from a club balcony.   (Bob Porter -- WBGO, NJ -- says that she died eventually from those injuries). 
  

 
 
 

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 Falling off stage and hitting head

Lord Ulli
The Lords

"Last weekend Lord Uli of The Lords died on stage. After a collapse he hit his head, fell into a coma and never awoke again.

Ulli was the charismatic singer of The Lords, one of two German beat bands, that got nationwide interest in the 60s. Their greatest hit was "Over in the Gloryland".
"

The charismatic singer Lord Ulli said once (I'm quoting from memory): "When I die, I'd like to drop dead from the stage". And that's exactly what happened at their 40 years anniversary gig. Lord Ulli fell from the stage and broke his skull. He died a few days later in hospital. ~ 22.10.1999!

About the Lords: Although Germany had its place in rock & roll's evolution in the 1960s, it was primarily as an incubator for British bands playing grueling stints in Hamburg, not for homegrown talent. The Lords were about the best of a weak scene, populated by bands that could never seem to shake themselves free of stodgy Central European oom-pah folk traditions. Quite popular in their own country, the Lords made no impression in the English-speaking world until a couple of decades later, when reappreciation of '60s beat and garage music became so intense that collectors began to investigate the strange and wonderful world of Continental '60s rock.
The Lords are one of those groups that have to be heard to be believed. Although they had the requisite moptop haircuts, their repertoire was surprisingly anachronistic at times, drawing heavily from not only German drinking songs, but American folk tunes, Lonnie Donegan's skiffle, and the pre-Beatle British rock of Johnny Kidd & the Pirates. Whatever they covered — "Greensleeves," "Shakin' All Over," "Poison Ivy," "Tobacco Road," "Que Sera," "Sing Hallelujah" — they made their own with frantically fast tempos, heavily accented Teutonic vocals (virtually all of their material was in English), and heavy overuse of tremelo guitar lines with mucho reverb, whammy bar, and Lesley organ-like effects. They also wrote some interesting material of their own that drew from the more contemporary influences of Merseybeat and English mod pop. The Lords were not brilliant musicians or composers, but they were fun, and they had the hearts of true rockers, although some modern listeners will find their approach too hammy and sloppy.

Between 1964 and 1968, the Lords were very prolific, issuing five albums and over a dozen singles. Unfortunately, there has yet to be a Lords compilation that truly focuses upon their best material, although a couple of their later albums have been reissued in Germany. As the group was pretty erratic (nobody wants to hear their singalong drinking tunes these days), a well-chosen anthology is necessary to appreciate their virtues; the North American listeners lucky enough to hear the group's best stuff have usually done so via tapes made by other collectors. — Richie Unterberger
 

 Falling and hitting head

Ray Conniff
Born: November 6, 1916,
 Attleboro, Massachusetts
Died:
October 12, 2002
Escondido, CA

LA (AP)--Ray Conniff, the Grammy Award-winning composer and bandleader whose arrangements epitomized the Big Band sound while spawning such albums as “S'Wonderful'' and “Somewhere My Love,” has died. He was 85. Conniff died Saturday at Palomar Medical Center in Escondido after falling down and hitting his head, San Diego medical examiner's investigator Angela Wagner told The Associated Press. He had suffered a stroke in April. Conniff had more than 100 recordings and produced 25 Top 40 albums for Columbia Records. He rendered such classics as ``Besame Mucho'' and ``New York, New York,'' in a career that spanned six decades.

His most memorable song may have been ``Somewhere My Love.'' The song was adapted from French composer Maurice Jarre's ``Laura's Theme'' from the film ``Dr. Zhivago.'' It rose to the top of the pop and easy-listening charts and won Conniff a Grammy in 1966.

Conniff produced 10 gold and two platinum records. He won CBS Records' Best Selling Artist for 1962 for the recording, ``We Wish You A Merry Christmas.''

The Ray Conniff Orchestra and Singers typified the lounge-singing style of the 1950s and 1960s with a mix of wordless vocal choruses and light orchestral accompaniment.

Though he got his start as a trombone player in the Big Band era playing with Bunny Berigan, Bob Crosby and Artie Shaw, Conniff broke out as a solo artist after being hired as a house arranger with Columbia Records in 1951.

He was responsible for Johnny Mathis' ``Chances Are,'' Frankie Laine's ``Moonlight Gambler,'' Johnnie Ray's ``Just Walking in the Rain,'' and Guy Mitchell's ``Singing the Blues.'' He also did arrangements for Frank Sinatra, Rosemary Clooney and Marty Robbins.

It was Conniff's arrangement of ``Band of Gold'' for singer Don Cherry that hit the first high note of both men's careers. The song made No. 5 on the Top 40 and was widely thought to be Cherry's hottest recording.

In 1956, Columbia decided to try out Conniff as a featured performer with a big-band mix that included guitarists Al Caiola and Tony Mottola. His debut album, ``S'Wonderful,'' in which he combined a chorus of four men and four women with a traditional big band mix of 18 instruments, stayed on the Top 20 charts for nine months.

A 1962 article in McCall's magazine described his band as ``singers who 'play' their voices as though they were instruments, more like subtly fluted woodwinds than singing.''

A few of Conniff's singers were known studio vocalists including Loulie Jean Norman and B.J. Baker. Jay Meyer assisted as conductor.

Conniff's instrumental arrangements provided easy listening for a booming adult album market.

His popularity waned with the rise of rock 'n' roll but stars such as The Carpenters, Simon and Garfunkel, The Fifth Dimension and Bert Bacharach benefited from his arrangements with recordings of ``Laughter in the Rain,'' ``I Write the Songs,'' and ``I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing.''

Conniff received countless international awards, continued touring and produced about an album a year.

He performed at the White House during the Vietnam War and in 1974 was the first pop artist asked to record an album in Moscow. In 2001, he gave a series of concerts in Brazil. He performed ``Somewhere My Love'' at the wedding of David Gest and Liza Minnelli in March.

Born in November 1916 in Attleboro, Mass., Conniff gained much of his musical experience from his father, a trombone player, who led a local band while his mother played the piano.

Conniff led a local band while in high school. He moved to Boston and began playing with Dan Murphy's Musical Skippers. He moved to New York during the swing era in the mid-'30s and landed a job playing and arranging for Berigan in 1937.

By 1939, he moved to Hollywood to join Bob Crosby's Bobcats, one of the hottest bands of the time.

``He was always reinventing himself, that's how he was able to continue his popularity for so many years,'' said fan club official Warren Pischke.

Conniff is survived by his wife, Vera; a daughter, Tamara Conniff; son, Jimmy Conniff; and three grand children. ~ By Kate Berry
 

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