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Rick Danko
Rick Danko
December 10, 1999
Age 56
 
Cause unknown as yet 
 
OBITUARY 
BIOGRAPHY  
LINKS 
 

   
More information RD page 2

 
 
 
 

OBITUARY 
       
 
 
  Band Website 
  In memory of Rick Danko
  
                Lead singer. Instrument: Bass, violin, guitar. 
                Dec. 29 1942 - Dec. 10 1999. The music will live forever.  

                  
                by Carol Caffin 

                Copyright © Carol Caffin, CRW Music. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted without permission.  

                Since 1965, when he and his cohorts in The Band (then called the Hawks) conspired with Bob Dylan to 
                “go electric,” Rick Danko has been an integral part of the popular music landscape. As lead singer, bass 
                and acoustic guitar player for The Band, and as a solo artist, his contributions have been substantial.  

                Hailing from the tiny rural town of Simcoe, Ontario, Rick was born into a musical family. Both of his 
                parents and his three brothers played and/or sang, and music was a way of life for him from the beginning. 
                He listened to Hank Williams and Sam Cooke as a small child, and was “ready to go to Nashville” by the 
                age of seven. With his oldest brother, Maurice (“Juinor”), Rick sang and performed at family get-togethers 
                and made his public debut on four-string tenor banjo before an audience of his first-grade classmates.  

                Rick quit school at 14 to purse music full-time and in 1960, when he was 17, he joined rockabilly singer 
                Ronnie Hawkins’ group, the Hawks, initially as rhythm guitarist. He soon moved to bass, learning his 
                instrument “one string at a time”, and, with the help of the Hawks’ boogie-woogie piano player (and later, 
                piano player for the late 1980s incarnation of The Band) Stan Szelest, whose left-hand techniques he 
                memorized and adapted to his bass playing, began developing his trademark percussive but sliding style.  

                Under Ronnie Hawkins’ tutelage, Rick began a three-year tenure of non-stop gigging and rigorous 
                rehearsals that fellow Band-mate Richard Manuel once likened to “boot camp.” By the time he was 20, 
                he was a seasoned pro, having spent most of his teenage years “playing in bars that you were supposed to 
                be 21 to play in.”  

                By the early 60s, Rick and the other Hawks had outgrown the limited roadhouse and honky-tonk circuit 
                and left Hawkins to pursue greener pastures. Bob Dylan saw them perform in the mid-60s and was so 
                impressed that he signed the Hawks to accompany him on his 1965-66 world tour. The Band’s 
                collaboration with Dylan, initially greeted with boos and catcalls around the globe, changed the course of 
                popular music by spawning one of the most significant musical hybrids of the rock era, “Folk Rock.”  

                Rick’s penchant for musical hybrids began germinating, literally, in his own backyard in Simcoe, a town 
                heavily populated with displaced Southern tobacco farmers. The interesting mix of Northern and Southern 
                cultures there was later reflected in his music and is partly responsible for the occasional Southern 
                inflection that colors some of his words.  

                After the tumultuous world tours with Dylan (the European leg of which was documented in the obscure 
                film, Eat the Document), Rick moved from Manhattan to upstate New York, along with Dylan and the 
                other members of the still un-named Band. He rented a big pink house in West Saugerties, near 
                Woodstock, and with Dylan and The Band began recording songs which soon surfaced on bootlegs and 
                were officially released in 1975 as The Basement Tapes. In 1968, after toying with a host of politically 
                incorrect names, like the Crackers and the Honkies, The Band made its official debut with the release of 
                its seminal and eclectic album, Music From Big Pink, which became the fulcrum for the country rock and 
                roots rock of the coming decades. The music of The Band was at once traditional and contemporary, and 
                the combination made it timeless. In the eye of the psychadelic hurricane, The Band virtually pioneered the 
                use of traditional instruments like mandolins, accordions, and fiddles in rock and roll, and Rick Danko was 
                one of the first non-rockabilly player to use standup acoustic bass on a rock record In the midst of 
                political unrest and the peace movement, The Band’s lyrics celebrated real life -- beauty, tranquility, 
                nature, good sex, good friends, small town America, Southern Culture -- a series of themes whos 
                influences would be felt in another musical hybrid, Americana, 25 years later.  

                Big Pink catapulted The Band, if not to commercial superstardom, to the upper echelon of rock music. 
                Many brows were furrowed, but accolades abounded, and even Eric Clapton cited them as a major 
                influence and the impetus for leaving the electric power trio Cream behind to go solo.  

                A succession of albums and tours followed, and, The Band, now a firm fixture in the rock aristocracy, 
                played virtually every major festival from Woodstock to Watkins Glen. In 1976, on Thanksgiving day, 
                The Band officially called it quits with a farewell concert at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom. The 
                concert, which featured an unprecedented all-star lineup to which The Band graciously played back-up, 
                was documented in Martin Scorsese’s much lauded film, The Last Waltz, regarded by many as the finest 
                concert film of all time.  

                After The Last Waltz, Rick, who needed music as much as it needed him, continued to perform and 
                record. His 1978 debut solo album, a self-titled gem which was initially overshadowed by the grandeur of 
                The Last Waltz, but has since garnered both critical and popular acclaim, marked the beginning of a very 
                important phase for Rick.  

                His transition from ensemble player to frontman seemed an easy one. Rick Danko (Arista) was no Band 
                album in disguise. On the contrary, it showcased his individuality -- his wonderful harmonies, his mature 
                and sensitive songwriting, his sense of humor (evidenced on the tongue-in-cheek “Java Blues”), his “less is 
                more” approach to playing and arranging, his affinityi for odd collaborations (the pairing of Eric Clapton’s 
                electric rock guitar with Band mate Garth Hudson’s ethereal country accordion on the Danko-penned 
                “New Mexico”), and the strongest vocal work of his career.  

                During the early 1980s, Rick maintained a low profile, and in 1983, reunited with The Band (minus 
                Robbie Robertson, who pursued a solo career). During that period, he began playing acoustic guitar as 
                well as bass on-stage, and his unique style of tuning and playing (revealing the bass player in his soul), has 
                become another of his signature sounds. Throughout the 80s, never one to “sit at home”, Rick continued 
                to play solo, with The Band, in pairings with Richard Manuel, Levon Helm, Paul Butterfield, Jorma 
                Kaukonen and others. In 1985, he appeared (with Manuel, Helm and Hudson) in a feature film, Man 
                Outside, and in 1987 he released an instructional video, Rick Danko’s Electric Bass Techniques 
                (Homespun).  

                The last several years arguably have ben Rick’s most productive. In 1989, he and Band dummer/vocalist 
                Levon Helm toured as part of Ringo Starr’s All-Starr Band (Rick’s rendition of Buddy Holly’s “Raining In 
                My Heart,” which appeared on the live album Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band (Rykodisc) and 
                features Clarence Clemons on sax, has become a highlight of his live solo shows). That same year, The 
                Band was inducted at Canada’s Juno Awards into the Hall of Fame of the Canadian Academy of 
                Recording Arts and Sciences. In 1990, Rick, along with Helm, Hudoson, Sinead O’Connor, Van 
                Morrison and others, appeared in Roger Waters’ The Wall concert in Berlin. In October, 1992 Rick 
                performed with The Band at the Bob Dylan 30th Anniversary tribute at Madison Square Garden and, in 
                January 1994, he and The Band were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. The induction speech 
                was made by long-time friend and fan, Eric Clapton.  

                In 1991, Rick began working on a project that woul;d become near and dear to his heart, a collaboration 
                wiht Folk legend Eric Andersen and Norwegian singer/songwriter Jonas Fjeld. The almost immediate 
                result of the trio’s collaboration was an award-winning album, Danko Fjeld Andersen (Stageway), which 
                was honored in Norway with a Spellemans Pris (the Norwegian Grammy) for Record of the Year and 
                was released in late 1993 by Rykodisc. The Rykodisc release was honored by NAIRO the following 
                year. Danko Fjeld Andersen, which contains some of Rick’s finest work to date, received a four-star 
                review in Rolling Stone.  

                1993 proved to be a banner year for Rick. In addition to the “Trio Album,” Rick and The Band recorded 
                their first studio album in 17 years, the acclaimed Jericho (Pyramid), which featured a rootsy rendition of 
                Bruce Springstein’s “Atlantic City,” and several original compositions. In early 1996, The Band came 
                back strong with High On The Hog (Pyramid), followed by Jubilation in 1998.  

                In February, 1997, Rykodisc released Ridin’ On The Blinds, the follow-up to Danko Fjeld Andersen, 
                which was recorded in Norway in 1994. Rick will tour the US with his trio mates in support of the record. 

                With so many irons in the fire, it’s too early to say that Rick Danko has come full circle. But certainly, he 
                has come into his own. And, after all, as Rick himself admits, he’s not trying to change the world -- he just 
                wants “to help the neighborhood.” 

                [The Rick Danko bio is written by Carol Caffin. Copyright © Carol Caffin, CRW Music. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted without permission.]  
 

    
  
The Band's Rick Danko Dead At Fifty-Six 
Rick Danko, bassist for the Band and solo artist, 
found dead morning after his birthday

                             Founding member of the Band, 
                             solo artist and Rock & Roll Hall of 
                             Famer Rick Danko passed away 
                             Friday morning in his Woodstock, 
                             N.Y., home. His wife, Elizabeth, 
                             found him in his bed, where he'd 
                             apparently died peacefully in his 
                             sleep -- one day after his fifty-sixth 
                             birthday. 

                             Although no cause of death was 
                             known by Friday afternoon, 
                             Danko's publicist, Carol Caffin, said that she spoke 
                             to him Thursday and that he had been in good 
                             spirits. 

                             "I just spoke to him yesterday, and he was in a 
                             great mood," said Caffin. "I told him I had some 
                             interviews lined up, and he said, 'Sure, we'll do them 
                             tomorrow afternoon.' And then I hear this morning. 
                             We all love him very much -- he was a great, 
                             wonderful person." 

                             Caffin said Danko had just returned from a short 
                             tour, including stops in Chicago and Ann Arbor, 
                             Mich. He had also just taped a performance for 
                             Acoustic Café. In August, he performed with fellow 
                             Band member Garth Hudson at the "Day in the 
                             Garden" festival at Max Yasgur's farm, the site of 
                             the original Woodstock, at which the Band 
                             performed in 1969.  

                             Danko's last solo album, Live on Breeze Hill, was 
                             released in September. The mostly live album 
                             featured one studio track, "Sip the Wine," which 
                             was recorded twenty years ago. A portion of the 
                             proceeds from the album were earmarked to benefit 
                             Greenpeace. Danko hadn't released a solo album 
                             since his 1977 self-titled solo debut, though he 
                             recorded two albums in the Nineties with 
                             singer/songwriters Eric Anderson and Jonas Fjeld: 
                             1993's Danko/Anderson/Fjeld and 1997's Riding on 
                             the Blinds. He also joined fellow Band members 
                             Hudson and Levon Helm for the group's recent 
                             comeback albums Jericho (1993), High on the Hog 
                             (1996) and last year's Jubilation. (Original guitarist 
                             Robbie Robertson chose not to participate in the 
                             reunion records; pianist Richard Manuel committed 
                             suicide after a show in 1986.)  

                             Danko was a key member of the Band from the very 
                             beginning, when the group backed Ronnie Hawkins 
                             as the Hawks. His signature falsetto was a hallmark 
                             of the Band's vocal sound. His songwriting credits 
                             included the enduring "This Wheel's on Fire," which 
                             he co-wrote with Bob Dylan. The song appeared on 
                             Dylan's famous collaboration with the Band, The 
                             Basement Tapes. 

                             "He was one of the most distinctive voices in one of 
                             the most distinctive sounding groups in rock & roll," 
                             commented longtime friend Richard Fusco, chief 
                             creative officer of the online radio station 
                             RadioWoodstock. "He stayed here in Woodstock -- 
                             he made this his home, and was one of the true 
                             landmark people in town. He was the type of guy 
                             that would always go out of his way to help 
                             somebody; if there was ever a benefit in town to help 
                             somebody locally, he was always there playing. He 
                             was a real giving person, besides being an incredible 
                             talent and a real fun guy to be with." 

                             John Simon, who produced the Band's Music From 
                             the Big Pink, The Band and The Last Waltz, said 
                             he will best remember Danko for his positive 
                             attitude. 

                             "Rick was always a very positive, uplifting and 
                             uplifted guy," Simon said. "He would always be the 
                             first guy there for rehearsals and recordings 
                             sessions. He was always very encouraging to other 
                             musicians; when other people in the world might not 
                             give somebody the time of day, Rick would be very 
                             patient, encouraging and loving to those people. He 
                             had a great sense of humor, and he was a natural 
                             musician.  

                             "When he first started out as a teenager, up in 
                             Ontario, he used to be a one-man band leader," 
                             continued Simon. "He'd go into a town and put up 
                             posters saying 'dance coming up,' and then put a 
                             band together for the dance and put the money in a 
                             cigar box. All the guys in The Band were natural 
                             musicians -- and this was before it was popular and 
                             cool to be a musician. After the Beatles, everybody 
                             wanted to be a musician, whether they had a natural 
                             calling for it or not, but prior to that time, it was not 
                             so glamorous. You only did when you had nothing 
                             else to do or when you were really good at it, and he 
                             was one of those guys who was really good at it. 
                             That's why the Band was so phenomenal -- every 
                             one of them were really good musicians; there 
                             weren't any slackers in that group."  

                             In 1997, Danko was found guilty of colluding to 
                             smuggle heroin into Japan. He told the judge that he 
                             used the drug -- along with prescription morphine -- 
                             to help fight persistent pain from a 1968 automobile 
                             accident. When asked about Danko's history with 
                             the drug in relationship to his death, however, Fusco 
                             said that the musician had appeared to be in robust 
                             health. 

                             "He'd gained a little wait, but he didn't seem 
                             unhealthy," said Fusco. "You can tell a junkie when 
                             you see a junkie, and he was nothing like that at all. 
                             He seemed strong." 

                             "We were looking forward to doing lots of live 
                             performances with him here from our studio," Fusco 
                             said sadly. "God bless him, we won't be doing that." 

                             RICHARD SKANSE/Rolling Stone 
                             (December 10, 1999)  

 
 

OBITUARY
BIOGRAPHY
LINKS TOP
 
 
 
 
 

 
BIOGRAPHY
 
 
CANOE/Pop Encyclopedia 

                              Hailing from the tiny rural town of Simcoe, Ontario, Danko 
                              was born into a musical family. Both of his parents and his 
                              three brothers played and/or sang, and music was a way of 
                              life for him from the beginning. He listened to Hank Williams 
                              and Sam Cooke as a small child, and was ready to go to 
                              Nashville by the age of seven. With his oldest brother, 
                              Maurice (Juinor), Rick sang and performed at family 
                              get-togethers and made his public debut on four-string tenor 
                              banjo before an audience of his first-grade classmates.  

                              He quit school at 14 to purse music full-time and in 1960, 
                              when he was 17, he joined rockabilly singer Ronnie 
                              Hawkins' group, the Hawks, initially as rhythm guitarist. He 
                              soon moved to bass and, with the help of the Hawks' piano 
                              player Stan Szelest.  

                              Under Ronnie Hawkins' tutelage, Danko began a three-year 
                              tenure of non-stop gigging and rigorous rehearsals that fellow 
                              Band-mate Richard Manuel once likened to 'boot camp.' By 
                              the time he was 20, he was a seasoned pro, having spent 
                              most of his teenage years playing in bars that you were 
                              supposed to be 21 to play in.  

                              By the early 60s, Rick and the other Hawks had outgrown 
                              the limited roadhouse and honky-tonk circuit and left 
                              Hawkins to pursue greener pastures. Bob Dylan saw them 
                              perform in the mid-60s and was so impressed that he signed 
                              the Hawks to accompany him on his 1965-66 world tour. 
                              The Band's collaboration with Dylan, initially greeted with 
                              boos and catcalls around the globe, changed the course of 
                              popular music by spawning one of the most significant 
                              musical hybrids of the rock era, 'Folk Rock.'  

                              After the tumultuous world tours with Dylan (the European 
                              leg of which was documented in the obscure film, Eat the 
                              Document), Danko relocated from Manhattan to upstate 
                              New York, along with Dylan and the other members of the 
                              still un-named Band. He rented a big pink house in West 
                              Saugerties, near Woodstock, and with Dylan and The Band 
                              began recording songs which soon surfaced on bootlegs and 
                              were officially released in 1975 as The Basement Tapes. In 
                              1968, after toying with a host of politically incorrect names, 
                              like the Crackers and the Honkies, The Band made its 
                              official debut with 'Music From Big Pink'.  

                              The album shot The Band into folklore. A succession of 
                              albums and tours followed, and, The Band, now a firm 
                              fixture in the rock aristocracy, played virtually every major 
                              festival from Woodstock to Watkins Glen. In 1976, on 
                              Thanksgiving day, The Band officially called it quits with a 
                              farewell concert at San FranciscoDs Winterland Ballroom. 
                              The concert, which featured an unprecedented all-star lineup 
                              to which The Band graciously played back-up, was 
                              documented in Martin ScorseseDs much lauded film, The 
                              Last Waltz, regarded by many as the finest concert film of 
                              all time.  

                              Following 'The Last Waltz', Danko continued to perform 
                              and record as a solo artist. His 1978 self-titled debut, though 
                              overshadowed at first by The Band, later gained critical and 
                              popular acclaim.  

                              During the early 1980s, he maintained a low profile, and in 
                              1983, reunited with The Band (minus Robbie Robertson, 
                              who pursued a solo career). During that period, he began 
                              playing acoustic guitar as well as bass on-stage, and his 
                              unique style of tuning and playing (revealing the bass player 
                              in his soul), has become another of his signature sounds. 
                              Throughout the 80s, never one to 'sit at home', Rick 
                              continued to play solo, with The Band, in pairings with 
                              Richard Manuel, Levon Helm, Paul Butterfield, Jorma 
                              Kaukonen and others. In 1985, he appeared (with Manuel, 
                              Helm and Hudson) in a feature film, Man Outside, and in 
                              1987 he released an instructional video, 'Rick Danko's 
                              Electric Bass Techniques' (Homespun).  

                              In 1989, he and Band drummer/vocalist Levon Helm toured 
                              as part of Ringo Starr's All-Starr Band. That same year, The 
                              Band was inducted into the Canadian Academy of Recording 
                              Arts and Sciences Hall Of Fame. In 1990, Danko, along with 
                              Helm, Hudson, Sinead O'Connor, Van Morrison and others, 
                              appeared in Roger Waters' 'The Wall' concert in Berlin.  

                              Danko recorded with Folk legend Eric Andersen and 
                              Norwegian singer/songwriter Jonas Fjeld in 1991 and one 
                              sidebar of the trio's collaboration was an award-winning 
                              album, Danko Fjeld Andersen (Stageway), which was 
                              honored in Norway with a Spellemans Pris (the Norwegian 
                              Grammy) for 'Record of the Year' and was released in late 
                              1993 by Rykodisc. The Rykodisc release was honored by 
                              NAIRO the following year.  

                              In October, 1992 he performed with The Band at the Bob 
                              Dylan 30th Anniversary tribute at Madison Square Garden 
                              and, in January 1994, he and The Band were inducted into 
                              the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame by Eric Clapton.  

                              1993 saw The Band record their first studio album in 17 
                              years, 'Jericho', which featured a radically extended line-up 
                              of members including Richard Bell. They followed this up 
                              with another album, 'High On The Hog', in 1996.  

                              In February, 1997, Rykodisc released 'Ridin' On The 
                              Blinds', the follow-up to Danko Fjeld Andersen, which was 
                              recorded in Norway in 1994.  

                              Danko passed away in his upstate New York home on 
                              Friday, December 10, 1999.  

                              With notes from Jan Høiberg and Rob Bowman  



Band Website 
The Band's Rick Danko Revs Up Legendary Career
 

                by Matthew Lewis 

                From Variety, March 1997.  

                HARTFORD, Conn. (Reuter) - It's been nearly 30 years since the Band helped define American rock music, but singer and bassist Rick Danko feels he's just getting warmed up.   

                After a long layoff from making records in the 1980s and early '90s, Canadian Danko is brimming over with recording and concert projects.   

                "I love to play; a stage is a safe place for me to be," Danko told Reuters in an interview. "It's not that way for most folks, but I'd be lost without it."   

                Still one of rock's great voices at age 53, Danko is more visible these days than at any time since The Last Waltz, director Martin Scorsese's celebrated documentary of the Band's star-studded 1976 "farewell" concert.   

                One of Danko's side projects, the critically acclaimed trio Danko/Fjeld/Andersen, in February released its second album, Ridin' on the Blinds, on the Rykodisc label.   

                The project reunited Danko with his friends Jonas Fjeld, one of Norway's biggest stars, and Eric Andersen, the respected songwriter who sprang from the 1960s New York folk scene.   

                The new album is an intoxicating blend of American roots music seasoned with exotic, centuries-old Norwegian folk instruments. One highlight is Danko's poignant, acoustic rendition of "Twilight," an obscure 1975 Band song.   

                In addition, the Band will soon start work on its next album, targetted for release in early 1998. The legendary group, which reunited without Richard Manuel, who committed suicide in 1986, and key songwriter Robbie Robertson, has released two albums in the last three years.   

                The group plans a 35-concert U.S. tour this summer.   

                Then there is Danko's revved-up solo career. He will tour Japan in April and May, and is planning a live album that would serve as the long-awaited followup to his 1978 solo album, which featured Eric Clapton and the Rolling Stones' Ron Wood.   

                Danko, who lives in Woodstock, N.Y., also says he'd like to make a "rock 'n' roll duo" album with Rolling Stones great Keith Richards, but no plans have been set yet.   

                Asked about the flurry of activity, Danko said, "I get bored pretty easy, but I'm lucky to have a lot of musical friends that help me take care of those moments."   

                A recent solo concert in tiny Foxboro, Mass., captured Danko in fine voice. Expertly backed by drummer Randy Ciarlante and pianist/accordionist Aaron Hurwitz, Danko romped through old classics like "Stage Fright" and "Mystery Train," and a funked-up "Chest Fever" from the Band's famous debut album.   

                Originally formed in 1960 as the backing group for Arkansas rockabilly wild man Ronnie Hawkins, the Band combined good-time rock 'n' roll with American folk traditions like no group before or since. The group's first two albums, Music From Big Pink (1968) and The Band (1969), still rate highly on many critics' all-time "best" lists.   

                At the heart of the Band's distinctive sound was the deeply soulful singing of Danko, drummer Levon Helm and Manuel.   

                "Rick's voice is incredibly unique," said Hurwitz, who is also the Band's co-producer. "It's a gutsy sound,  t's haunting, and it really appeals to people."   

                Asked about his vocal influences, Danko lists Hank Williams, Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, Kitty Wells, Patsy Cline, and Muddy Waters, among many others.   

                Danko's heartfelt style was developed the hard way. He quit school in Simcoe, Ontario, at age 14 and went to work as an apprentice meatcutter. He was still a teenager when he ran away to join Hawkins's rockabilly roustabouts.   

                Never a prolific songwriter, Danko has co-written some gems over the years. "This Wheel's on Fire," which he wrote with Bob Dylan in 1967, has rolled in its share of royalties -- most recently as the theme music for the British TV series "Absolutely Fabulous."   

                Danko said there are many old Band songs on which he and the others should have been credited as co-writers, instead of being credited solely to Robbie Robertson.   

                Robertson wrote the group's best-known songs, including "The Weight," "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" and "Up on Cripple Creek."   

                "He'll say he did it all, if you give him the opportunity," Danko said of Robertson. Danko said he empathizes with Mike Love, the Beach Boy who sued bandmate Brian Wilson for withholding songwriting credits on many well-known songs. "Maybe I'll have to end up hiring his lawyer," he laughed.   

                The surviving original Band members have turned down offers in the millions of dollars to reunite, Danko said. "Money isn't the object anymore. We're not looking for a job."   

                He strongly disagrees with some critics who have carped that the Band without Robertson is like "Hamlet" without the prince. "Robbie chose to do what he chose to do, and more power to him. I think he's regretted some of those movements, but that's not my problem."   

                Robertson has released three solo albums as well as some movie soundtracks for Scorsese since leaving the Band.   

                Danko feels that the "new" Band -- with original members Danko, Helm and Garth Hudson augmented by Ciarlante, Jim Weider and Richard Bell -- is every bit as valid as the "old" Band. "I appreciate the chemistry of the Band over the years and everybody's contribution," he said. "I would like to see that continue for just as long as we can breathe good air."   
 

                Copied from an article posted in the newsgroup rec.music.dylan by Mike Fink.  

 
 
 
 
  
 
 

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