FULLER UP
HOME
GRIM REAPER
PAGE
CAUSES OF
DEATH
SEARCH BY
NAME
GET IN
TOUCH
SHAMEFUL DISCLAIMER
 
 Fuller Up The Dead Musician Directory 
 
Jesse Stone
Jesse Stone
Kidney/Heart  April 1, 1999
Age 97
OBITUARY 
BIOGRAPHY  
LINKS
 
 
 
 

OBITUARY 
        
       
NY TIMES 
    Jesse Stone, 97, Developer of Rock's Early Hits
 

          By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

               ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. -- Jesse Stone, who wrote "Shake, 
               Rattle and Roll" and helped develop many of the Atlantic Records 
          label's biggest rock-and-roll hits, died here on Thursday after a long 
          illness. He was 97.  

          As a writer, producer and arranger at Atlantic, Stone worked with artists 
          like Ray Charles, Big Joe Turner, the Drifters and the Clovers. Among 
          his other songs were "Idaho" and "Money Honey."  

          In 1974, the head of Atlantic Records, Ahmet Ertegun, said, "Jesse 
          Stone did more to develop the basic rock-and-roll sound than anybody 
          else."  

          Stone's wife, the singer Evelyn McGee Stone, said that even on the day 
          her husband was hospitalized for the last time he had begun writing a 
          song while he watched her playing with their dog.  

          "I had been saying to the dog, 'That's it, that's it,' and he wrote a song, 
          and that's the title," she said.  

          The grandson of Tennessee slaves, Stone had a career that embraced 
          minstrel music, folk songs, dance tunes, rhythm-and-blues, rock-and-roll 
          and jazz. He helped build Atlantic Records into a top rhythm-and-blues 
          label in the late 1940's and early 50's, signing stars like Ruth Brown.  

          "Her first record came out: Bang! It was a hit," Stone said in a 1991 
          Associated Press interview. "We got a group called the Clovers. Their 
          record came out. Bang! It was a hit. Everything we touched after that 
          went over big. Sometimes we had four or five records on the chart at the 
          same time."  

          Stone and Bill Haley, who had a Top 10 hit in 1954 with Stone's "Shake, 
          Rattle and Roll," paved the way for the acceptance among whites of what 
          had been considered "Negro music."  

          "A white man recording black music," Stone said of Haley in the 
          interview.  

          "That's when white people began to buy this stuff.  

          They could hear it on the air."  

          Elvis Presley's nationwide success the following year cemented the 
          foundation laid by black singers, many with Stone's tunes and 
          arrangements.  

          Earlier, Stone's jazz tune "Idaho" was a big hit for Guy Lombardo, selling 
          three million copies in the mid-1940's. Benny Goodman and Jimmy 
          Dorsey also had hit recordings of the tune.  

          Stone was born in Atchison, Kan., on Nov. 16, 1901, and started 
          performing at age 5, touring with his family's minstrel show. In the 1920's 
          he led a jazz group that included the future saxophone legend Coleman 
          Hawkins.  

          Stone, who also wrote under the name Charles Calhoun, was inducted 
          into the Rhythm-and-Blues Hall of Fame in 1992.  

          He is survived by his wife.  
    
 

 
Rock Pioneer  Dies In Florida

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. (Reuters) - Rock and roll pioneer songwriter Jesse Stone, composer of the classic ``Shake, Rattle & Roll,'' has died at age 97, his attorney said Friday. 

Stone died Thursday at a hospital near Altamonte Springs, in the Orlando area where he and his wife, singer Evelyn McGee Stone, moved in the early 1980s, attorney Dan Fallon said. 

He had been on kidney dialysis and recently suffered from heart problems, Fallon said. 

As a composer and arranger at Atlantic Records in the 1940s and 1950s, he worked with artists such as Big Joe Turner (''Shake, Rattle & Roll,'' later popularized by Bill Haley and His Comets), Ray Charles (''It Should Have Been Me''), the Drifters (''Money Honey'') and the Clovers (''Your Cash Ain't Nothin' But Trash''). 

Discussing Atlantic Records' history in 1974, company President Ahmet Ertegun said: ``Jesse Stone did more to develop the basic rock 'n' roll sound than anybody else.'' 

Stone, who sometimes wrote under the name Charles or Chuck Calhoun, was born in Atchison, Kansas, on November 16, 1901, and got his start in show business touring with his family's minstrel show. 

In the 1920s, he led a jazz group that included saxophone legend Coleman Hawkins. In the heyday of Kansas City jazz, Stone was a prominent pianist and arranger. 

In 1936, Duke Ellington helped Stone get a booking at New York's famed Cotton Club. Stone went on to work at the fabled Apollo, composing songs, arranging and also writing jokes and sketches for comedians. 

He made his first big mark with the jazz standard ``Idaho,'' first recorded by Benny Goodman and several other bands, in 1942. 

Although Stone had retired, in the '80s and early '90s he accompanied his wife on keyboards and wrote many of the songs on her recent album, ``Jump Back.'' 

His last live performance was on February 26 at the Black Entertainment Television sound stage at Walt Disney World, Fallon said.  
 

 
 
 
       
 

OBITUARY
BIOGRAPHY
LINKS TOP
 
 
 
 
 

 
BIOGRAPHY
 
 
 
 
  
 
 

OBITUARY
BIOGRAPHY
LINKS TOP
 
 
 
 

 LINKS
  
 
 
 
 
 

OBITUARY
BIOGRAPHY
LINKS TOP
 
 
 
 
 
FULLER UP
HOME
GRIM REAPER
PAGE
CAUSES OF
DEATH
SEARCH BY
NAME
GET IN
TOUCH
SHAMEFUL DISCLAIMER
 
 
 
TOP