FULLER UP
HOME
GRIM REAPER
PAGE
CAUSES OF
DEATH
SEARCH BY
NAME
GET IN
TOUCH
SHAMEFUL DISCLAIMER
 
 Fuller Up The Dead Musician Directory 
 
Ella Mae Morse
Ella Mae Morse
October 16, 1999
Age 75
 
Respiratory Failure
 
    
OBITUARY 
BIOGRAPHY  
LINKS
 
 
 
 

OBITUARY 
        
CD NOW Allstar News
       Ella Mae Morse, 1940s Hitmaking Vocalist, Dies At 75
   
   
                        Ella Mae Morse, the R&B-styled jazz singer 
                        whose 1942 hit record "Cow Cow Boogie" was 
                        Capitol Records' first million seller, died of 
                        respiratory failure Saturday (Oct. 16) in 
                        Bullhead City, Ariz., at the age of 75.  

                     Aside from being responsible for Capitol's first 
                     success -- putting it on course to become one 
                     of the biggest of record labels -- Morse sang 
                     in a musical style that cleverly blended 
                     elements of jazz, R&B, pop and country that 
                     would typify the insurgent rock and roll sound 
                     of the 1950s. The white Morse was often 
                     misidentified as black, as she'd come up under 
                     the tutelage of African-American artists. (Elvis 
                     Presley cited her as a crucial musical 
                     influence.) Aside from "Cow Cow Boogie," her 
                     10 gold records also included "House Of Blue 
                     Lights."  

                     Ella Mae Morse was born in Mansfield, Texas 
                     on Sept. 12, 1924, the daughter of a 
                     drummer-father and a pianist-mother. After 
                     singing in her father's jazz combo, Morse 
                     joined the Jimmy Dorsey group while only 14. 
                     (Morse's mother had told Dorsey that her 
                     daughter was 19 -- and he fired her when he 
                     discovered the truth.) Still, Morse's talent was 
                     obvious, and in 1942 recorded "Cow Cow 
                     Boogie" with Dorsey's former pianist Freddie 
                     Slack.  

                     Morse played predominantly as a solo artist 
                     thereafter, and from the early 1940s to the 
                     early 1950s released such top 10 his as 
                     "House Of Blue Lights," "Shoo Shoo Baby," "No 
                     Love, No Nothin'," and "The Blacksmith Blues."  

                     Morse's final recording was Capitol date Morse 
                     Code in 1957. She continued to perform 
                     occasionally over the next 30 years, often 
                     with Ray McKinley's band.  

                     Ella Mae Morse is survived by her husband 
                     Jack Bradford and their children Dan and 
                     Laura. Morse had four children from previous 
                     marriages, plus eight grandchildren and three 
                     great-grandchildren.  

                                              -- Drew Wheeler

    
      BULLHEAD CITY, Ariz. (AP) - Ella Mae Morse, whose classic 1942 recording 
    ``Cow Cow Boogie'' became Capitol Records' first million-selling single, died 
    Saturday. She was 75. 

    She had been suffering respiratory problems following a long illness, 
    according to her publicist. 

    The Texas-born Ms. Morse combined boogie woogie, blues, jazz, swing and 
    country influences in the 1940s and 50s, helping to create a pioneering 
    ``pop'' sound that would later grown into rock 'n' roll. Elvis Presley even 
    praised her for teaching him how to sing. 

    Described as a black-trained, white ``hepchick,'' her songs, including ``The 
    House of Blue Lights,'' earned her 10 gold records. 

    Ms. Morse stopped recording in 1957, but continued performing until 1987. 

 
NY TIMES
        
 
 
 
 
       
 

OBITUARY
BIOGRAPHY
LINKS TOP
 
 
 
 
 

 
BIOGRAPHY
 
 
All-Music Guide
 
 BORN: September 12, 1924, Mansfield, TX

                    One of the most talented and overlooked vocalists of the '40s,
                    Ella Mae Morse blended jazz, country, pop, and R&B; at times
                    she came remarkably close to what would be known as rock &
                    roll. When she wasn't yet 14, Morse had her first taste of the big
                    time, when Jimmy Dorsey's band came to Dallas for a stay at the
                    Adolphus Hotel and she called for an audition. Unbeknownst to
                    her, the band needed a new female vocalist. Believing that
                    Morse was indeed 19, as she and her mother claimed, Dorsey
                    hired her. When he received a letter from the school board
                    declaring that he was responsible for The Morse's care, Dorsey
                    fired her. Morse joined former Dorsey pianist Freddie Slack's band
                    in 1942; she was only 17 when they cut "Cow Cow Boogie,"
                    which became Capitol Records' first gold single. The following
                    year, Morse began recording solo. Although her recordings were
                    consistently solid and sold fairly well (frequently charting better
                    on the Black charts than on the pop charts), Morse never
                    obtained a huge following. She retired from recording in 1957. ~
                    Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All-Music Guide 

 
 
  
 
 

OBITUARY
BIOGRAPHY
LINKS TOP
 
 
 
 

 LINKS
  
 
           

           
           
               
           
           

 
 
 
 

OBITUARY
BIOGRAPHY
LINKS TOP
 
 
  
 
 
FULLER UP
HOME
GRIM REAPER
PAGE
CAUSES OF
DEATH
SEARCH BY
NAME
GET IN
TOUCH
SHAMEFUL DISCLAIMER
 
 
 
TOP